Inequality Quotes

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Washing one's hands of the conflict between the powerful and the powerless means to side with the powerful, not to be neutral.
[Power] [Inequality] [Radicalism] [Neutrality] [Powerlessness] [Paulo Freire]

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Aristotle's axiom: The worst form of inequality is to try to make unequal things equal.
[Inequality] [Laurence J. Peter]

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When the gap between the rich and the poor is so huge that you can?t help pointing it out ? that?s when you risk being labeled a pervert.
[Funny] [Inequality] [Benson Bruno] [Perversion]

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I am opposing a social order in which it is possible for one man who does absolutely nothing that is useful to amass a fortune of hundreds of millions of dollars, while millions of men and women who work all the days of their lives secure barely enough for a wretched existence.
[Capitalism] [Poverty] [Wealth] [Justice] [Inequality] [Labor] [Feudalism] [Aristocracy] [Eugene Victor Debs]

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The first person who, having enclosed a plot of land, took it into his head to say this is mine and found people simple enough to believe him was the true founder of civil society. What crimes, wars, murders, what miseries and horrors would the human race have been spared, had some one pulled up the stakes or filled in the ditch and cried out to his fellow men: "Do not listen to this imposter. You are lost if you forget that the fruits of the earth belong to all and the earth to no one!
[Inequality] [Jean-Jacques Rousseau]

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It is not inequality which is the real misfortune, it is dependence.
[Inequality] [Voltaire] [Dependence]

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Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living things, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on the earth. I said then and I say now, that while there is a lower class, I am in it; while there is a criminal element, I am of it; while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.
[Inspirational] [Freedom] [Humanity] [Compassion] [Inequality] [Radicalism] [Subversion] [Kinship] [Eugene Victor Debs]

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[M]en, though they know full well how much women are worth and how great the benefits we bring them, nonetheless seek to destroy us out of envy for our merits. It's just like the crow, when it produces white nestlings: it is so stricken by envy, knowing how black it is itself, that it kills its own offspring out of pique.
[Women] [Men] [Empowerment] [Feminism] [Envy] [Gender] [Jealousy] [Dignity] [Inequality] [Misogyny] [Hypocrisy] [Imagery] [Worth] [Suppression] [Ugliness] [Crows] [Merits] [Moderata Fonte]

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There is no deception on the part of the woman, where a man bewilders himself: if he deludes his own wits, I can certainly acquit the women. Whatever man allows his mind to dwell upon the imprint his imagination has foolishly taken of women, is fanning the flames within himself -- and, since the woman knows nothing about it, she is not to blame. For if a man incites himself to drown, and will not restrain himself, it is not the water's fault.
[Women] [Men] [Double Standards] [Gender] [Perception] [Inequality] [Misogyny] [Expectations] [Prejudice] [Social Norms] [Stereotypes] [Deceit] [Discrimination] [Delusion] [Cause And Effect] [Self Deception] [John Gower]

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Not all men (and especially the wisest) share the opinion that it is bad for women to be educated. But it is very true that many foolish men have claimed this because it displeased them that women knew more than they did.
[Education] [Wisdom] [Women] [Men] [Knowledge] [Empowerment] [Inequality] [Christine De Pizan] [Abilities] [Superiority] [Suppression]

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[I]f a woman is given a bad reputation -- however contrary to the facts -- any man will be loath to marry her, as one sees all the time. Yet take a man who has slept with a hundred women and may be the vilest lecher on earth, and there is still no delay in a wife being found for him, whether he is knight, baron, or whatever, so long as he's rich. The girl can be absolutely virginal and innocent, her spouse as corrupt as you like. What logic can anyone see in this?
[Women] [Men] [Anonymous] [Double Standards] [Gender] [Inequality] [Misogyny] [Hypocrisy] [Social Norms] [Stereotypes] [Chastity]

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When you hear men talking," said Cornelia, "all they ever do is speak ill of women. ... And I don't quite know how they managed to make this law in their favour, or who exactly it was who gave them a greater license to sin than is allowed to us; and if the fault is common to both sexes (as they can hardly deny), why should the blame not be as well? What makes them think they can boast of the same thing that in women brings only shame?
[Women] [Men] [Double Standards] [Empowerment] [Feminism] [Gender] [Sin] [Inequality] [Misogyny] [Hypocrisy] [Prejudice] [Social Norms] [Stereotypes] [Vice] [Self Perception] [Moderata Fonte] [Preconcenptions]

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If it is as evil to do lechery as the Bible and the Lord Himself tell us, then who is the more blameworthy: the one who instigates it, or the one who doesn't so much do it as suffer what men do to her? You know very well that it is the male who it, and whoever says otherwise is wrong and is lying through his teeth, unless he has no teeth -- and would to God he hadn't.
[Women] [Men] [Anonymous] [Double Standards] [Gender] [Inequality] [Misogyny] [Social Norms] [Stereotypes] [Chastity] [Immorality]

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Yet if women are so flighty, fickle, changeable, susceptible, and inconstant (as some clerks would have us believe), why is it that their suitors have to resort to such trickery to have their way with them? And why don't women quickly succumb to them, without the need for all this skill and ingenuity in conquering them? For there is no need to go to war for a castle that is already captured. (...) Therefore, since it necessary to call on such skill, ingenuity, and effort in order to seduce a woman, whether of high or humble birth, the logical conclusion to draw is that women are by no means as fickle as some men claim, or as easily influenced in their behaviour. And if anyone tells me that books are full of women like these, it is this very reply, frequently given, which causes me to complain. My response is that women did not write these books nor include the material which attacks them and their morals. Those who plead their cause in the absence of an opponent can invent to their heart's content, can pontificate without taking into account the opposite point of view and keep the best arguments for themselves, for aggressors are always quick to attack those who have no means of defence. But if women had written these books, I know full well the subject would have been handled differently. They know that they stand wrongfully accused, and that the cake has not been divided up equally, for the strongest take the lion's share, and the one who does the sharing out keeps the biggest portion for himself.
[Women] [Books] [Men] [Double Standards] [Gender] [Perception] [Inequality] [Misogyny] [Hypocrisy] [Prejudice] [Social Norms] [Injustice] [Stereotypes] [Deceit] [Christine De Pizan] [Suppression] [Slander] [Misrepresentation] [Fickleness] [Defenselessness] [Unfairness] [One Sidedness] [Received Opinion]

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[W]hat reasoning is this, to criticize an innocent majority who seldom make a slip, for a single act? This is not right. Why can't blame be borne individually for individual guilt? ... But for the love of Christ, those of you with some sense, do not blame the innocent without cause. For if, every time you see one man doing wrong, you're going to accuse all men likewise, it won't take long in any one day before you'll be saying that all men ought to be hung. If one man is a rogue, are all men too? No, there's no logic in that; you know what's true. Were a man hung or dismembered for theft, and they proposed to dish up the same treatment to you, you wouldn't consider it legal. You would look quite unamused, and take the liberty of bidding goodbye to all who pronounced that sort of judmgent. Think of others as you would have them think of you ... Let each bear guilt individually as is only right -- and as you'd wish to be upheld in your own case if you were innocent.
[Anonymous] [Individuality] [Behavior] [Guilt] [Justice] [Inequality] [Expectations] [Prejudice] [Innocence] [Judgment] [Responsibility] [Stereotypes] [Blame] [Conduct] [Condemnation] [Legality]

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[In 16th century European society] Marriage was the triumphal arch through which women, almost without exception, had to pass in order to reach the public eye. And after marriage followed, in theory, the total self-abnegation of the woman.
[Women] [Marriage] [History] [Men] [Empowerment] [Feminism] [Gender] [Perception] [Independence] [Dignity] [Inequality] [Misogyny] [Self Determination] [Social Norms] [Matrimony] [Women S Rights] [Married Life] [Wedlock] [Subjugation] [Antonia Fraser] [Self Abnegation]

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It was a fact generally acknowledged by all but the most contumacious spirits at the beginning of the seventeenth century that woman was the weaker vessel; weaker than man, that is. ... That was the way God had arranged Creation, sanctified in the words of the Apostle. ... Under the common law of England at the accession of King James I, no female had any rights at all (if some were allowed by custom). As an unmarried woman her rights were swallowed up in her father's, and she was his to dispose of in marriage at will. Once she was married her property became absolutely that of her husband. What of those who did not marry? Common law met that problem blandly by not recognizing it. In the words of [the leading 17th century compendium on women's legal status]: 'All of them are understood either married or to be married.' In 1603 England, in short, still lived in a world governed by feudal law, where a wife passed from the guardianship of her father to her husband; her husband also stood in relation to her as a feudal lord.
[Women] [Marriage] [History] [Men] [Empowerment] [Feminism] [Gender] [Fathers] [Independence] [Inequality] [Husbands] [Misogyny] [Self Determination] [Social Norms] [Matrimony] [Women S Rights] [Married Life] [Feudalism] [Bonds] [Guardianship] [Common Law] [Wedlock] [Property] [Subjugation] [Antonia Fraser] [The Lawes Resolutions]

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This pre-eminence is something [men] have unjustly arrogated to themselves. And when it's said that women must be subject to men, the phrase should be understood in the same sense as when we say we are subject to natural disasters, diseases, and all the other accidents of this life: it's not a case of being subjected in the sense of obeying, but rather of suffering an imposition, not a case of serving them fearfully, but rather of tolerating them in a spirit of Christian charity, since they have been given to us by God as a spiritual trial.
[Women] [Men] [Empowerment] [Feminism] [Gender] [Dignity] [Inequality] [Misogyny] [Social Norms] [Self Esteem] [Superiority] [Subjugation] [Moderata Fonte] [Subjection] [Pre Eminence]

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The top 10 per cent of the US population appropriated 91 per cent of income growth between 1989 and 2006, while the top 1 per cent took 59 per cent.
[Inequality] [Free Market] [Ha-Joon Chang]